Relief Printmaking Refresher

Relief printmaking is a graphic and versatile type of printmaking. This fast-paced refresher class is a great bridge for people familiar with block printing to refresh their technique and become comfortable cranking out prints at Spudnik Press.

The class will revisit the entire process from selecting a material to carve to the proper use of gauges to inking plates and using a press. Each week will review foundational skills while helping students develop a more nuanced understanding of the process and materials.

For those who may seek inspiration and motivation as much as demonstrations, the class will look at lots of prints using a range a carving styles and printing methods. Mini projects will encourage students to experiment with mark making, texture, pattern, color, shape, contrast and materials.

Building off these exercises, students should be ready to begin an independent project that will continue beyond the brief four-week class.

 

Screenprinting Explorations (Sep 2016)

Most people are fans of screenprinting whether they know it or not. Screenprinting is an art form known for its bold graphics and its usefulness. A close cousin of stenciling, screenprinting is easy to learn, yet hard to master. Our eight-week class provides adequate time for new printers to complete a range of projects on paper and fabric, gradually increasing in complexity and nuance. With the ongoing support of a pro to help trouble-shoot along the way, students will be familiar with dark room exposure, mesh count, screen tension, ink consistency, and registration. In addition to developing A+ printing skills, this class will help students develop their imagery, be it hand-drawn illustration or digital files, to work best as a print. By the end of the class, students will know their way around the printshop, and be well equipped to continue printing independently at Spudnik Press Cooperative.

Saturday Morning Illustration Club

How can visual artists tell non-verbal stories? Illustrations can evoke the senses, imply a story, and represent moods and ideas difficult to put to words. Saturday Morning Illustration Club will investigate the role of narrative in illustration by developing “visual vocabularies” and approaches to communicating time, space and perspective in still images.

In addition stretching the ideation phase of illustration, students will work with a variety of art materials to translate their vision to the page. Sketching exercises and class projects will encourage students to hone their drawing and composition skills. Inking exercises will encourage students to experiment with pens, markers, and India ink and how different materials generate distinct styles.

Two final portfolio projects will allow students to bring these skills together: a single-page illustration that communications multiple themes or ideas and a collection of sequential images that work together as a series. Through both, personal style will support the concept to tell a compelling narrative.

Anyone who loves to draw is welcome. So regardless if your art ends up in comics, zines, posters, apparel, stationary, screen prints or your own living room wall, you are bound to benefit.

Letterpress I: Wood and Metal Type (Sep 2016)

Letterpress printing uses moveable type, cast from metal or carved from wood, and a mechanical press to crisply transfer ink to paper. Since the advent of letterpress printing in the mid-15th century, printers have been enamored with the process of hand-setting lead and wood type. Today we remain fascinated with this tactile process. Artists and printers continually find new ways to approach the art form.

Letterpress I uses a range of projects to familiarize students with the history and practice of letterpress printing and typography. Learning through doing, students will build confidence not only printing, but also understanding the vocabulary around letterpress printing. The class will begin with hand-setting linear type to print business cards, a short poem, etc. Students will practice setting printing pressure, adjusting ink, and will gain a respect for our antique presses and our collection of type. Students will then continue to acquire the technical skills and creative approaches to print through independent and collaborative projects.

Wearable Prints: Screen Print Your Own… (Sep 2016)

Convert your own drawing or design to a collection of hand-printed wearable items in this energetic and informative one-day workshop. Printing an assortment of t-shirts or totebags is practical, fun and incredibly gratifying!

Arriving with a simple black and white drawing, a high-contrast photo, or art designed in Illustrator or Photoshop, students will have time on site to (if needed) refine the artwork to be best suited for screenprinting. Each student will use a pre-coated photographic screen and mix their own custom ink color. Everyone is encouraged to bring about five items of their choosing to print. As long as they are fabric and flat, we can help you print on it! T-shirts, tote bags, tea towels, bandanas, and thrift store jean jackets, will work great. Leave with a sample for an Etsy store, a surprise gift for a friend, or an eco-friendly alternative to plastic bags!

Risography 101 (Sep 2016)

The Risograph is an automated duplicator from Japan that efficiently produces offset-like photocopies. Though not originally intended for artistic application, the machine has recently gained traction (and notoriety) in small-press culture for its distinct footprint and efficiently as well as being rather finicky.

This workshop will walk students through the fundamentals of Risograph printing for making books and fine art prints, and familiarize students with techniques to best reproduce their imagery. Students will become acquainted with the mechanics of the printer and learn basic maintenance, including how to change the master roll and a drum’s ink tube. Lastly, students will learn how to best design for the Risograph, taking into consideration ink drying time, ink density, paper options, registration, and patience. Everyone will leave with a three-color collaborative print produced throughout the workshop and authorization to continue making Risograph prints at Spudnik Press Cooperative.

Screenprinting Refresher (Sep 2016)

Open to anyone with prior printing experience, this refresher workshop will assume that students already understand screenprinting and have previous experience, but are feeling out-of-practice or fuzzy regarding the finer points of the process. Students should have already completed a one-day workshop or full class, although it need not have been at Spudnik, or even in the recent past. We also welcome printers that would like support working through a particularly complex project or reoccurring printing issue.

Spudnik Press staff will review an assortment of skills such as: selecting the best mesh count, applying the perfect coat of photo emulsion, troubleshooting and identifying the source of exposure and printing issues, ink mixing, registration, and screen reclamation. Perhaps more importantly, we’ll learn how to take these technical factors into consideration when designing a project for screenprinting.

While students should have a project in the pipeline to put their newly learned skills to practice, during the workshop, students will choose from a variety of images designed to hone nuanced printing skills. During the workshops, each student will expose a screen, and work with peers to print a two-color image.

The workshop will end with Spudnik Press staff meeting with each printer to provide consultation for their next project, ensuring they are able to produce a fantastic project while avoiding technical issues. Plus, to help build confidence printing at Open Studio sessions, students are expected to return within the week (free of charge!) to put their freshly acquired knowledge to use. Through this workshop, students will not only brush up on old skills and become authorized to print at Spudnik, but are sure to walk away with new morsels of useful information regarding the art of screenprinting.

Letterpress I: Wood and Metal Type (Oct 2016)

Letterpress printing uses moveable type, cast from metal or carved from wood, and a mechanical press to crisply transfer ink to paper. Since the advent of letterpress printing in the mid-15th century, printers have been enamored with the process of hand-setting lead and wood type. Today we remain fascinated with this tactile process. Artists and printers continually find new ways to approach the art form.

Letterpress I uses a range of projects to familiarize students with the history and practice of letterpress printing and typography. Learning through doing, students will build confidence not only printing, but also understanding the vocabulary around letterpress printing. The class will begin with hand-setting linear type to print business cards, a short poem, etc. Students will practice setting printing pressure, adjusting ink, and will gain a respect for our antique presses and our collection of type. Students will then continue to acquire the technical skills and creative approaches to print through independent and collaborative projects.

Etching & Intaglio Refresher

Open to anyone with prior intaglio experience, this fast-paced refresher class will revive rusty skills and renew confidence in the printshop with the ultimate goal of inspiring a new body of prints. The class will focus first and foremost on bringing printers up to speed with etching and intaglio printing at Spudnik Press. Each student will be provided two small copper plates, encouraging participants to hone a variety of techniques. From these experimental plates, students should feel well prepared to begin a substantial independent project that will continue beyond the brief four-week class.

Specifically, the class will begin by reviewing basic plate making techniques such as degreasing and filing plates, applying ground, mark making, etching, dry point and aquatinting. Moving on to printing press, students will deepen their understanding of inks, additives, and all-around best practices for inking and printing copper plates. Students will also have the opportunity to learn how to plan for and print multiple-plate images. In addition to plenty of demonstrations and hands-on time to work, students will be able to consult with staff on plans for any current and planned print projects.

Bookbinding: The Coptic Stitch

Originally used by the early Christians in Egypt (the Copts) some 2000 years ago, the coptic bound book is characterized by its strength and attractive chain-link stiches across the spine. Coptic bound books lay flat when opened, making them the ideal platform for journaling, sketching, and a variety of artist book concepts. Students will become familiar with bookbinding tools, materials, and terminology, as well as sewing skills that will allow students to complete a coptic bound book from start to finish. This includes skills such as folding signatures, gluing paper and book board, and sewing multiple book block sections together.

This short format four-week class allows students to delve into a particular bookbinding structure, learn variations to the structure, and ultimately design and create their own customized book. Students will explore how to consider content and functionality when determining the binding style and aesthetics of the book. These classes are great way for experienced bookbinders to refresh or hone skills and new bookbinders to experiment with a new craft.

Risography 101 (Oct 2016)

The Risograph is an automated duplicator from Japan that efficiently produces offset-like photocopies. Though not originally intended for artistic application, the machine has recently gained traction (and notoriety) in small-press culture for its distinct footprint and efficiently as well as being rather finicky.

This workshop will walk students through the fundamentals of Risograph printing for making books and fine art prints, and familiarize students with techniques to best reproduce their imagery. Students will become acquainted with the mechanics of the printer and learn basic maintenance, including how to change the master roll and a drum’s ink tube. Lastly, students will learn how to best design for the Risograph, taking into consideration ink drying time, ink density, paper options, registration, and patience. Everyone will leave with a three-color collaborative print produced throughout the workshop and authorization to continue making Risograph prints at Spudnik Press Cooperative.

Screenprinting 201: Textiles

Expand your screenprinting know-how with this concentrated class focused on fabric printing. Week one will include an overview of the full process, including crucial tips for selecting, coating, exposing and printing screens best suited for fabric printing.

In the following weeks, students will have the opportunity to:

–       Practice making a variety of repeat patterns using handmade stencils or Adobe software.
–       Experiment with tiling layers to build larger compositions.
–       Measure and plan for printing yardage.
–       Mix ink and consider color and pattern relationships
–       Print on padded tables without hinges.
–       Use padded table printing yardage or wall-sized hangings.
–       Explore how different materials and types of fabric absorb ink and pigment.

Through completing a variety of small starter projects, students will have developed the skills they need to embark on comprehensive projects ranging from producing yards of fabric for sewing projects to printed canvases for 2-d or 3-d art projects. By capping the class to 4 to 8 students, everyone will have plenty of individual technical support for whatever their ultimate printing goals are.

Interested in T-Shirt Printing? Consider enrolling in a 1-day workshop or Screenprinting Camp: Apparel Printing.