Relief Printmaking: Innovative Approaches

In this variation of our introductory relief printmaking class, each student will conceptualize, hand print, and bind a complete artist book. This project-based approach will introduce all the foundational skills of relief printmaking, such as carving, inking, and printing a woodblock, as well as how to exploit positive and negative space in a block printed image. The flutter book format, a variation of an accordion-fold book, allows multiple pages to be unfolded and morph into many directions and contextual avenues. Each student will develop and execute a unique plan for his or her book project, taking into consideration image and text relationships, page imposition, and the basic principles of and materials for relief printmaking.

Screenprinting On Paper

Master the foundational skills and needed to create screenprinted images on paper. Learn how mesh count, tension, ink consistancy, exposure times and registration all work in symphony to create exquisite products. This class establishes a wide base of skills including use of handmade stencils and photo emulsion, mixing ink, and printing tricks to create clean and professional prints. By the end of the class, students will choose an independent project that could be anything from a set of greeting cards to a gig poster, fine-art print, or components for a zine.

Letterpress Finesse: Independent Projects

After completing Letterpress I and/or Letterpress II, the students will devise their own project to take up the entirety of the eight-week course using skills that they have learned in either or both of the preceding courses. This class is designed to push the individual from concept and design through to a much more extensive end result than what they created in Letterpress I or II. An example of a project could be, but not limited to: a small book of poems that gets bound together, a calendar, a collection of greeting cards, a series of musical posters, a suite of wedding invites, etc. The first class would be a discussion-based meeting where the members of the class brainstorm ideas and sketches, than would jump right into making week two. In progress critiques focusing on the original plan would help to keep the work on target, smart, aesthetically interesting or beautiful, and engaging. Strong emphasis on typography, printing, and craftsmanship would be integral for the success of this class to elevate it above what is learned in Letterpress I and II.

Letterpress I: Wood & Metal Type, Begins 5/3

Letterpress printing uses moveable type cast from metal or carved into wood and a mechanical press to crisply transfer ink to paper. This class uses multiple projects to familiarize students with basic letterpress and typography history, terminology, and practices. The class will begin with hand setting linear type to make business cards, note cards, stationary, etc. Students will then continue to use both independent and collaborative projects to acquire the technical skills needed to safely use a variety of presses, including setting type, distributing type, inking the press, color matching, adjusting pressure, registering paper, making an impression and cleaning the press.

Letterpress Your Own Cards, 5/18/2014

Letterpress printing brings a level of sophistication to note cards, stationary, gift tags, and business cards. This introduction to this printing process from the 15th century will familiarize students with metal type and letterpress terminology. Through creating a small edition of greeting cards or business cards, each student will take a turn locking up their type and printing with our platen presses. Students will each make about 25 cards with up to 3 short lines of text, choosing a typeface and paper stock to work with. The class is limited to six students so that everyone has time to run a press independently.

Printmaking Survey: Monoprinting, Etching, Letterpress

Experiment with three unique printmaking processes in one class. Monoprinting, etching, and letterpress offer a trifecta of opportunities for artists and creative people to learn processes and experiment with making images. These three oil-based printmaking processes range from experimental to exacting, bold to subdued, and unpredictable to calculated. In combination, these processes can open new possibilities for artists, writers, and folks who want to learn a new way to make art. Printmaking Survey classes can act as either a general introduction to everything Spudnik has to offer, or a refresher course for artists who have previous experience. This class can be taken independently or in conjunction with Printmaking Survey: Screenprinting, Relief, Lithography.

Screenprint Your Own T-Shirt, Sunday 6/22

This one-day shirt printing workshop provides a solid understanding of the screen printing process, and is a great way to see first hand how a design can translate to a print on apparel. Take this workshop as a first step to starting a product line, or a way to create personalized gifts for friends and family. The all afternoon format allows students the time they need to perfect their own design in class, using both simple tools like markers as well as Illustrator or Photoshop. Screens are pre-coated with photographic emulsion, and students will each be able to mix their own unique color of ink. Each person leaves the workshop with their own one-color design on 3-5 shirts, tote bags, or fabric of their choosing.

Screenprinting on Fabric

This class will introduce multiple techniques for screen printing onto fabric.  Beginning with basic stencil printing, students will establish printing skills and terminology. From there, students will learn to create both hand drawn and photographic images. Through weekly demonstrations, students will be exposed to ink mixing, color and pattern relationships, repeat pattern making and printing, approaches to developing imagery, multiple color registration, and discharge printing. The class will culminate with each student choosing an independent project, which can range from developing a line of shirts, creating merchandise for a band, or printing yardage for sewing projects.

Plate Lithography

Lithography uses a simple chemical process to create prints from a flat surface. The process is known for its ability to capture hand-drawn and expressive marks, shading, and texture. Aluminum plate lithography is a more predictable and less labor-intensive than traditional stone litho. In this class, students will become comfortable with the technical processes of etching and printing plates while seeing and experimenting with many approaches to developing imagery, such as incorporating many mark-making tools, transferring images to plates, overlapping or blending colors, and using chine colle. Students will hone printing skills through acting as a printing assistant for their peers. The class will culminate with students completing a class portfolio as well as an edition of their own prints.

Letterpress I: Wood & Metal Type, Begins 7/8

Letterpress printing uses moveable type cast from metal or carved into wood and a mechanical press to crisply transfer ink to paper. This class uses multiple projects to familiarize students with basic letterpress and typography history, terminology, and practices. The class will begin with hand setting linear type to make business cards, note cards, stationary, etc. Students will then continue to use both independent and collaborative projects to acquire the technical skills needed to safely use a variety of presses, including setting type, distributing type, inking the press, color matching, adjusting pressure, registering paper, making an impression and cleaning the press.

Making Time: Manifesting Sequential Narratives

It’s just a matter of time… This Special Topics class is an amazing opportunity to work alongside the talented Sara Drake (read her Bad at Sports interview to learn about her work!) exploring comics through the medium’s most fundamental element: time. Together we will examine different philosophies and narrative forms that attempt to represent time visually and use them as a starting point for our own practices. Through a series of weekly drawing exercises and assignments, we will experiment with the unique hybrid relationship between image and language that comics present. This class emphasizes experimentation over production and will best benefit creators looking to bring new energy and vision to their practice. Prior experience with drawing, writing or creating comics is welcome but not required.

Bookbinding

Bookbinding is a craft and art form that relies on a basic set of techniques, tools, and materials. Once foundational skills are mastered, bookbinders can add creativity, content, and design to create unlimited variations of handmade books. In this class, students will create their own books from scratch. Students will learn pamphlet, “perfect”, coptic, and stab bindings, as well as modifications of these traditional binding styles. Projects will focus on creativity, design, and craftsmanship with the goal that students are able to experiment with variations and incorporating content within the book through writing, simple printing tricks, and customizing paper for covers, inserts, or end-paper.  Students will leave with a small library of hand-bound books to fill or use as templates to make even more books.