Posts Categorized: Special Topics

T-Shirts & Totebags Screenprinting Workshop (April)

Convert your own drawing or design to a collection of hand-printed wearable items in this energetic and informative one-day workshop. Printing an assortment of t-shirts or totebags is practical, fun and incredibly gratifying!

Students will bring to the workshops with a bold black and white drawing, a high-contrast photo, or a digital design. While .AI or .PSD files are great, we welcome students to bring anything from text typed in Microsoft Word to photocopies. After students refine the artwork (as needed) to be “print-ready”, student will use a pre-coated photographic screen and mix their own custom ink color. Everyone should bring five items of their choosing to print. As long as they are fabric and flat, we can help you print on it! Shirts, tote bags, tea towels, bandanas, and thrift store jean jackets will all work great. Leave with a sample for an Etsy store, a surprise gift for a friend, or an eco-friendly alternative to plastic bags!

For those who love this introduction to screenprinting, our 8-week Screenprinting Explorations class will round out your skills and allow you print independently through our Open Studio program!

Papermaking Explorations (May)

Papermaking can be used as a catalyst for bookmaking, printmaking and drawing, as well as an art form all in its own.  Our introductory papermaking class walks students through the satisfying process of turning plant fiber into luscious handmade paper.

Students will learn how to form basic sheets of paper with a mould and deckle, and then expand upon that skill by exploring ways to manipulate the pulp. For example, students will add pigment to pulp to create custom tinted sheets of paper. Dyed pulp will also be used to integrate patterns and imagery into the papermaking process through pulp painting. “Inclusions” like fragments of prints, organic materials, or thread can also be integrated into the paper. Finally, using a wire armature, students can explore dimensional structures. Through these projects, students will also learn about the science behind papermaking, and how to select and use various plant fibers like cotton and abaca.

After surveying a range of papermaking skills, each student will be able to focus on a self-directed papermaking project with guidance and support from Teaching Artist, Molly Berkson. Students will graduate from this class with a hearty stack of their own handmade paper as well enough experience to continue making paper at home or at Spudnik Press. This is a wet process, so dress down for this class.

Photopolymer Intaglio (May)

Photopolymer Intaglio plates can capture every nuance of a continuous tone photograph, as well as direct drawing on transparent media. Using digital or handmade positives in combination with an aquatint screen, artists can easily simulate the look and feel of classic copperplate photogravure, montage, a variety of drawing techniques, or experiment with new directions. This class will benefit photographers and print artists looking to extend the tonal and textural possibilities of their artwork.

Students will work on a variety of plates to create a small series of prints. Through these projects, students will test out tools and materials to determine optimum exposure and ink density for various approaches to image making, film output and plate processes. During the printing portion of the class, students will refine their inking and plate wiping techniques for controlled and consistent printing from intaglio plates.

Cyanotypes: The Botany of Blue (June)

In 1843, a botanist and photographer named Anna Atkins self-published her first book of cyanotype photograms. Anna Atkins, who is often cited as the first woman photographer, has inspired many with her collection of brilliant blue prints that are both scientific and artistic. Cyanotypes are contact prints on light-sensitive paper, bridging photography and printmaking. UV light hitting treated paper triggers a chemical reaction that forms an intense blue dye. This workshop commemorates the work of Atkins by sharing the art form and process of creating cyanotypes.

After looking at historical examples of cyanotypes and the work of Anna Atkins, students in this workshop will explore the process through creating their own botanical prints. Part of the day, students will learn to use our NuArc platemaker to expose cyanotypes. Part of the day will be out of doors where students will use sunlight to make images from native flora, flower shop clippings and hand drawn transparencies.  No previous experience necessary for this explorative, and playful process.

Bookbinding Workshop: Simple Self-Publishing (June)

This workshop focuses on styles of bookbinding that are low-cost yet dynamic, and well suited for poetry chapbooks and portfolio books. Students will earn how to choose materials and create simple book structures that best highlight the content within their book.

The workshop will address the logistics of organizing poetry or artwork into a book form, explore the book as a vessel for information, and how material choices can inform how the book is read. While the workshop will create blank books, each style of binding will begin with standard 8.5” x 11” paper to allow your poetry or artistic content to be easily printed from a common inkjet or laser printer.

Students will complete four sample books: Two pamphlet stitch varieties, a perfect bound book, and a more elaborate Japanese stab binding.

In addition to learning hand skills, the class will discuss the history of chapbooks, their role in publishing over time, and ways to share and sell chapbooks. If you have writing or images you would like to promote, this is a great workshop to jump start your self-publishing!

Papermaking: Pulp Painting (July)

Pulp painting is a low-pressure and experimental papermaking method in which dyed pulp is applied to freshly pulled sheets of paper. As the pulp dries, the dyed fibers bonds with the base pulp to create a unified image this blends painting and papermaking.   

In this workshop, many techniques will be shared that combine freestyle painting and stenciling. Through “drawing” with bottled pulp and applying pulp with spoons, brushes, and every day materials, paper makers can create expressive or controlled images and patterns. Hard edges and clean lines can be produced with the help of hand-cut stencils. Plus simple inclusions like string and newspaper clippings can add yet another dimension to the paper.

Anyone who likes to dabble with new art-making processes will be able to learn a new non-toxic technique that can incorporated into handmade prints, paintings, artist books, installations, and endless craft projects.

Paper will be ready to be picked up two days following the workshop.

Polymer & Plate Lithography (August)

Plate lithography is a variation of traditional lithography and relies on the hydrophobic (water-fearing) and hydrophilic (water-loving) properties of a sheet of plastic or paper. Plate lithography offers an immediate and non-toxic printing process that can incorporate photography, digital designs and hand drawn illustrations. This process is low-cost, versatile, and playful process ripe for experimentation.

Plates can be made using an everyday laser printer, then reworked or added to with a variety of tools like ballpoint pens, crayons and markers. The plate is then carefully inks with oil-based ink and ran through a press.

In this workshop, students will learn both monoprinting techniques and how make an edition with polyester plates. Digital file preparation will be taught as it is necessary for working with photos. However these processes also lend themselves to hand drawn imagery, and the computer can be bypassed completely with the use of a photocopier.

By the end of the workshop, students will produce two images using a mix of techniques on 11” x 15” paper. First time printers as well as artists with photography and drawing experience are both well-suited for this workshop.

T-shirts & Totebags Screenprinting Workshop (August)

Convert your own drawing or design to a collection of hand-printed wearable items in this energetic and informative one-day workshop. Printing an assortment of t-shirts or totebags is practical, fun and incredibly gratifying!

Students will bring to the workshops with a bold black and white drawing, a high-contrast photo, or a digital design. While .AI or .PSD files are great, we welcome students to bring anything from text typed in Microsoft Word to photocopies. After students refine the artwork (as needed) to be “print-ready”, student will use a pre-coated photographic screen and mix their own custom ink color. Everyone should bring five items of their choosing to print. As long as they are fabric and flat, we can help you print on it! Shirts, tote bags, tea towels, bandanas, and thrift store jean jackets will all work great. Leave with a sample for an Etsy store, a surprise gift for a friend, or an eco-friendly alternative to plastic bags!

For those who love this introduction to screenprinting, our 8-week Screenprinting Explorations class will round out your skills and allow you print independently through our Open Studio program!

Cyanotypes: The Botany Of Blue (August)

In 1843, a botanist and photographer named Anna Atkins self-published her first book of cyanotype photograms. Anna Atkins, who is often cited as the first woman photographer, has inspired many with her collection of brilliant blue prints that are both scientific and artistic. Cyanotypes are contact prints on light-sensitive paper, bridging photography and printmaking. UV light hitting treated paper triggers a chemical reaction that forms an intense blue dye. This workshop commemorates the work of Atkins by sharing the art form and process of creating cyanotypes.

After looking at historical examples of cyanotypes and the work of Anna Atkins, students in this workshop will explore the process through creating their own botanical prints. Part of the day, students will learn to use our NuArc platemaker to expose cyanotypes. Part of the day will be out of doors where students will use sunlight to make images from native flora, flower shop clippings and hand drawn transparencies.  No previous experience necessary for this explorative, and playful process.